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Speech Language Pathologists

​Speech Language Pathologists work as part of the school team to support all students with needs in communication. DET speech language therapy services are delivered as part of the educational program and are directed towards improving educational outcomes to support successful transitions in education, training and work. A Speech Language Pathologist assesses, treats and supports people with difficulties communicating.  Some of the specific areas of communication we work with include:

 

  • Speech - ie. how a person uses sounds when talking. For example, a Speech language pathologist might work with a preschool child who is hard to understand, because her sounds have not developed appropriately (eg. she says ‘sish’ for ‘fish’).
  • Language - ie. how a person uses and understands words and sentences to communicate with others. For example, a Speech language pathologist might work with a younger child who has difficulty telling a story, difficulty using the right grammar when talking, and /or has a limited vocabulary.
  • Literacy – Acquisition of literacy, underlying developmental literacy skills, introducing literacy supports (e.g.: technology to assist reading/writing).
  • Stuttering - Speech language pathologists work with people who have a disruption of the smooth flow of speech.
  • Voice - Speech language pathologists work with people who have voice problems which are often a result of misuse or abuse of the vocal cords.
  • Social Skills - ie. those skills necessary to communicate appropriately with others. For example, a Speech language pathologist might work with a child who uses language inappropriately when talking to others (eg. has no eye contact, cannot start and maintain a conversation).
  • Feeding/Swallowing – feeding difficulties can occur in children and adults due to a variety of reasons. Speech Language Pathologists are often involved in the feeding management plan.